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grant
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Post by grant »

Actually, according to zhongwen.com, the characters in Chinese (which I think might be legible in Japanese, Vietnamese and Korean -- but am not sure) would be:


Image

(edited for being too blasted long, if you want the etymology of the characters, look them up)
Harvey Winters
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Post by Harvey Winters »

I'm sooooooooo truthfully impressed...

Portugese- "os comprido inverno"

Maori- (New Zealand) "Tuarura Makariri"

Hungarian- "Hossza Te'li"

Latin- "Prolix Frigus Tempus"
(As close as I could get was "Long Cold Time")
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Betty Felon
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Post by Betty Felon »

Japanese: Nagai Fuyu (Nah Guy Foo Yoo)

There are no plurals in Japanese. Nor is there any inflection to worry about... unless you see a clearly marked long vowel, all syllables get the same stress. Pronunciation is not very important.
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John
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Post by John »

just to clear some stuff up for the non-tonal language speakers on the board, the tonal languages, Mandarin, Vietnamese, etc., convey meaning not just through words, but also through pitch, so that the word "chang" spoken down low has a totally different meaning than the word "chang!" said up high. So that´s what all that is about.

On a related note, studies show that speakers of tonal languages have a much higher percentage chance of having what we call perfect pitch, because their ears are trained to recognise subtle differences of pitch.

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grant
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Post by grant »

Yes, quite. For instance, your dong is long and high. Were it short and descending, it might mean "heavy" or "hole," and if it went up and down and up again, it would mean "job."

So, I suppose the moral is, be careful with what you do to your dong.

----

Portuguese, a Brazilian fellow tells me, gives us Os longos invernos.


There is an auxiliary discussion to this now up over here, which has some interesting French idioms and expands some Japanese choices as well.
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Betty Felon
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Post by Betty Felon »

Nice thread, grant.

Just to add to the Japanese... it was said before in this thread that proper nouns aren't usually translated. However, the Japanese don't have a "L" sound; they have a R sound that is more of a cross between the L and R.

For instance a "television" in Japanese is a "terebi" (they don't have a "V" either...so it becomes "B") It's source of frustration for speakers going both directions and, of course, pretty funny as well-- "Lip my stocking! lip them!"

So even without translation, in Japan we'd have something along the lines of "Rong Wintasu"
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Post by NatureBoy »

John wrote:On a related note, studies show that speakers of tonal languages have a much higher percentage chance of having what we call perfect pitch, because their ears are trained to recognise subtle differences of pitch.


Nice 'filecard' John!
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grant
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Post by grant »

De långa vintrarna in Swedish, Barbelith tells me.

It's a nice thread, yes -- it's a nice group of people, for the most part.
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Post by Harvey Winters »

Grant?
How is it the Latin speaking Romans had no word for "Winter"?
Were all the seasons undefined then?

Sorry if I put any undo pressure on you for an answer...


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Betty Felon
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Post by Betty Felon »

Latin does have a word for winter: hiems, -is, f. (think "hibernate")

My latin is super rusty but I think it would be something like: Hiemes Longae. (Someone please correct that; I haven't looked at latin for at least 4 years.)

Watch out for online translators, they can't be depended on for accuracy.
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Post by Liesbeth »

grant wrote:De långa vintrarna in Swedish, Barbelith tells me.


That use of De seems wrong to me.
I don't know Swedish, but I do know Danish, and I think that all Skandinavian languages have the same thing where the definite article is a suffix (in this case vintrar-na, in Danish and Norwegian vintre-ne).
De would mean those.

So the correct Swedish would be Långa Vintrarna and I also have to correct my earlier Danish and Norwegian entry, which should be Lange Vintrene (rather than Vinterne). Hope those t-shirts weren't printed yet.
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