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Posted: Wed Jun 25, 2003 6:30 pm
by BladeRunner
yeah, but if you generalize everything like that, then everything is a drug, and then none of us, would do something and ten nothing, all in milliseconds, because it would be a drug to do everything, so we'd have to stop, only to realize that; that in-of-itself is a drug.

And can I feel the love?

Posted: Wed Jun 25, 2003 6:34 pm
by Moni
BladeRunner wrote:yeah, but if you generalize everything like that, then everything is a drug, and then none of us, would do something and ten nothing, all in milliseconds, because it would be a drug to do everything, so we'd have to stop, only to realize that; that in-of-itself is a drug.

And can I feel the love?


No I meant in a way where you use music as a catalyst because it's the only thing that can make you feel strong emotions.

From www.dictionary.com:

drug = "A chemical substance, such as a narcotic or hallucinogen, that affects the central nervous system, causing changes in behavior and often addiction." (apart from the medical term)

If you take it that way, music in fact can in fact be viewed as a drug in certain cases (tho it is not a chemical substance really).

Posted: Wed Jun 25, 2003 7:24 pm
by BladeRunner
yeah, but my point was that as easy as it is to classify something as a drug, when essentually everything can be classied as giving of a specific type of reaction to your system

just saying, we shouldn't generalize too much is all...

Posted: Thu Jun 26, 2003 8:17 am
by Moni
BladeRunner wrote:yeah, but my point was that as easy as it is to classify something as a drug, when essentually everything can be classied as giving of a specific type of reaction to your system

just saying, we shouldn't generalize too much is all...


ah okay..
but - everything? how's that? i don't think there are too many things you can use as "replacements" for "real life emotions"...?

And...
going back to the original question, I wouldn't go so far as to say that sad songs make us sad people, but listening to sad music can make us more "sad" people in a certain way. and that is, if you feel melancholy, sad or even depressed, it is the most natural thing to retreat. And as already said before, many people who like music listen to it when they're sad and want to be alone. And well, doing just that does feel good indeed, but it will just drag you more into sadness/melancholy. As natural as it is to neglect your social life when you are sad, it is exactly the wrong way if you want to get out of that blue mood. Being alone and listening to music that enhances what you are feeling right now gives you a lot of time to think about yourself, to brood over your situation etc. And then of course it will take you even longer to get out of that emotion.
Weirdly enough many people like it that way.

Now there's one useless ramble.

new lexicon?

Posted: Thu Jun 26, 2003 11:23 am
by omphale
Maybe it isn't useful to use the word 'drug' in this context. Maybe if we stick with 'addiction' or 'habit' we'll have an easier time understanding eachother.

:)

In any case, I'll add my two cents on this topic:



The unhappiest people I know, romantically speaking, are the ones who like pop music the most; and I don't know whether pop music has caused this unhappiness, but I do know that they've been listening to the sad songs longer than they've been living the unhappy lives.

I don't think I agree. I think that some people are, in fact, inherently sad. Maybe they're born with low seratonin levels or some other chemical imbalance. Or maybe such sad, difficult, painful things happened to them so early on that they can't remember a time when they weren't sad. I know that I have been identifying with the most melancholy of pop music since I was very young; long before a time when I could've possibly identified with the romantic (in the conventional sense) sentiments of the songs. But I did identify with the romantic natureof the songs, and I did it in an intense way.


From Websters:

Romantic:
4 a : marked by the imaginative or emotional appeal of what is heroic, adventurous, remote, mysterious, or idealized.

And some of us are just born romantics, I believe, and maybe that makes melancholia more appealing to us. But, at least in my experience, it also makes all sorts of other intense emotions/experiences more appealing to us than to the not-so-romantic folks out there, also.

Re: new lexicon?

Posted: Thu Jun 26, 2003 11:29 am
by Moni
omphale wrote:Maybe it isn't useful to use the word 'drug' in this context. Maybe if we stick with 'addiction' or 'habit' we'll have an easier time understanding eachother.


absolutely, i agree!