cinnamon drumming

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trashcan_afterthought
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cinnamon drumming

Post by trashcan_afterthought »

cinnamon is in 6/8, but doesnt it sound like the drums are playing 4/4? would that make it 6/4? i have no idea. it could be just me.
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BladeRunner
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Post by BladeRunner »

if it's playing in 6/8, it's 4-beat equviliant would be 2/4 or cut-time (2/2).
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Merlin
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Post by Merlin »

I've asked Michael to explain this to me at lesat twice, and I still don't understand what's happening. It's like the drumming equivalent of an Escher drawing.

I think it might be what Stewart Copeland (and Carl Jung) called "synchronicity."
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Fi
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Post by Fi »

cool, Im glad someone else asked about this. I mentioned it in someone else's forum and got yellow-carded.
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Unremarkable
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Post by Unremarkable »

*WHOOOSH!*

"What was that?"

"The sound of this thred flying right over my head."
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Fi
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Post by Fi »

4/4 & 3/4.. the drums are playing a rock beat and everything else is playing to a waltz kind of time. Super cool. Not having seen TLW live yet, I'm curious to see how people dance to this one.
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Mite
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Post by Mite »

There's actually a word for layering time signatures like this, although it's not coming to mind at the moment.

I thought it was jarring the first few times I heard the song, but after a while it just started feeling right in my head. Now I just don't think the song would work quite right with a 6/8 beat. 6/8 just doesn't rock as hard.
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Fi
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Post by Fi »

polyrhythmic?
Michael
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Post by Michael »

I wanted the song to sound like the Allman Brothers, Statesboro Blues perhaps, and 4/4 against 3/4 has that gentle floaty push that they do so well, like two jets flying in erratic formation that never quite collide.
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Rock the jam

Post by Bel and the Dragon »

Soon you will have two drummers and a cover of Whipping Post added to the live act.


-Ian-
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John
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Post by John »

Oh God, you're so close to predicting the future you can't even know. Two drummers, Whipping Post... that's it, we're all growing beards.
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Post by Bel and the Dragon »

The Long Winters: Live from the Fillmore East.


The cover of the record could have the band leaning against the van, drinking PBR, Milwaukee's Best, or perhaps tall boys of Schlitz.


"This next song is a little ditty called Stormy Monday...."



-Ian-
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anthropomorphizing_kitty
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Post by anthropomorphizing_kitty »

I'm really late posting to this thread, but being someone who aspires musically but gets completely lost with things like time signatures and...um...well keys and pretty much everything else "technical" i just wanted to say, Fi, you should teach music. I had no idea what you guys were talking about but when you mentioned it being like a waltz/rock fusion, I totally understood...I just had to imagine waltzing to it and then I could totally pick out the beat you were talking about.
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Fi
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Post by Fi »

hah! that's cool. actually, funny to read this old post. cinnamon was in the set on NYE, & so I finally did see it live.
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anthropomorphizing_kitty
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Post by anthropomorphizing_kitty »

I actually heard them perform Cinnamon, Shapes, and Stupid live before WIPTF came out. They played them at a show at the Crocodile the first time I saw them.
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Unremarkable
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Post by Unremarkable »

anthropomorphizing_kitty wrote:I actually heard them perform Cinnamon, Shapes, and Stupid live before WIPTF came out. They played them at a show at the Crocodile the first time I saw them.


Yeah, I had heard every song on WIPTF live before the album came out (except blue diamonds and blanket hog).
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thewalrus
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timing

Post by thewalrus »

i'm fairly sure the timing is 6/8 in cut time. this would, in turn, make it 3/4 in a sense, when in reality it is 6/8.
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Post by sillyho »

Mite wrote:There's actually a word for layering time signatures like this, although it's not coming to mind at the moment.


I think it may be called "hemiola".
Eh, here's a definition from http://www.music.vt.edu/musicdictionary/ and it seems to fit with what y'all are sayin.

In early music, this term meant the ratio of 3:2, employed musically in two senses: the ratio of the perfect fifth, whose musical value is 3:2, and the rhythmic relation of three notes in the time of two, i.e., the triplet. In the Baroque era hemiola was used in dance music in the sense that it denoted the articulation of two measures of triple meter as if they were three measures of duple meter. In later music, especially Viennese waltzes the use of hemiola was common, in the sense of playing duplets in one part of the music, over which another part of the music is playing triplets.

I seem to have a penchant for remembering mostly(or entirely)-useless words...do you suppose that's marketable?
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Post by Brantley »

No, it's called a polyrhythm (wikipedia.org). Your "hemiola" is an example of a polyrhythm, but is specific to 3:2 time.

Polyrythms are popular in traditional african music, especially west africa.
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Post by Samaritan »

Baring in mind all the points that have been talked over in the previous posts i have to say this,

It was the out of time drumming on this track that made it my least favorite of all. It just struck me as poorly composed... and out of time.
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