peanut-butter toast

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omphale
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peanut-butter toast

Postby omphale » Fri Oct 10, 2003 11:34 am

it has recently come to my attention that texans do not eat this particular breakfast favorite of mine.

my mother, a new yorker, puts catsup on her eggs. my father, a midwesterner, thinks this is bad, immoral and thoroughly disgusting. likewise with others of my mom's favorites, such as cream cheese and jelly sandwiches.

so i was thinking that these strange little food prejudices might be all there is left of american regionalism, in which case i think they should be celebrated wholeheartedly.

i'm hoping that y'all will either A)blow my little theory to smithereens by telling me that all kinds of texans eat peanut butter toast and midwesterners everywhere are eating their eggs with catsup these days or B)help me compile a fascinating little list of strange american regional food dogma.

come on, we all love food.....

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Unremarkable
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Postby Unremarkable » Fri Oct 10, 2003 11:50 am

First of all, it's ketchup, not "catsup". Second, putting ketchup on eggs is thoroughly disgusting (though my brother does it too). Thirdly, peanut-butter on toast is God's gift to breakfast.

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Betty Felon
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Postby Betty Felon » Fri Oct 10, 2003 3:13 pm

Ketchup on eggs is alright (my whole midwestern family does that) but it pales in comparison to the southwest's delightful food convention of eating EVERYTHING with green chili and/or salsa on it. Eggs without salsa is like pizza without beer.

In Santa Fe, you can order a green chili cheeseburger at McDonalds, green chili quesadillas at Taco Bell, and green chili pizza at Pizzahut (greenchili pizza = reallyreallyreally good). And in most restaurants, you need to specify it if you don't want your food swimming in chili. There are usually two types, red and green, one is mild and one is hot, though which is which varies from restaurant to restaurant. If you would like both, you say, "Make it Christmas." What I wouldn't give for a beer battered chili relleno right now.

The southwest also has a phenomenon called the "chilihead" which is a person who gets thier thrills finding/making/eating the hottest chili they can. Rumor has it the pain releases endorphins causing a natural high. Though this could just be a regional culture of masochism. There is a convention for it in Albaquerque. Some of the bottled stuff you have to sign a waver before you can buy it (though I'm not sure if that's a legal issue or part of the sell.)

Some places specialize in serving hot hot hot chili and it's about as close to a legal opium den that you can find in America. You'll see locals, college students, and the occasional trucker sitting in the corner spooning the stuff into thier mouths with tears and snot running all over thier faces (nice, huh?) People guard thier chili seeds and boast like they're talking about purebred horses.

If you would like to experience such a thing, I would recommend Horseman's Haven is Sante Fe, NM. Level II is the don't-even-touch-it-hot stuff, though level I is probably hot enough to give you the idea.

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heather
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Postby heather » Fri Oct 10, 2003 6:47 pm

Unremarkable wrote:First of all, it's ketchup, not "catsup". Second, putting ketchup on eggs is thoroughly disgusting (though my brother does it too). Thirdly, peanut-butter on toast is God's gift to breakfast.



1. ketchup vs. catsup
Both terms are acceptable. Although the latter should've been left behind in the 1950's.
2. ketchup [or catsup if you will] on eggs
FUCKING SICK.
3. peanut-butter on toast
heavenly. best joined with a cup of hot tea.

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Fi
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Postby Fi » Sat Oct 11, 2003 12:49 am

I'm not american but came home from one holiday there with a habit of putting barbeque sauce on too many things, including eggs. But there's one big popular condiment there - Triple A or something... that tasted like it might also strip old paintwork. Then again, some of my US pals think vegemite tastes like dog medicine.

Agreed, peanut butter toast is fabulous.

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Betty Felon
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Postby Betty Felon » Sat Oct 11, 2003 4:33 am

Fi wrote:Triple A or something... that tasted like it might also strip old paintwork.

A-1? Good Stuff.
Then again, some of my US pals think vegemite tastes like dog medicine.

Dog medicine? Hahahahahahaha. I'm afraid to try this stuff. It smells like dog medicine.

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LngHrvWntrsDngr
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Postby LngHrvWntrsDngr » Sat Oct 11, 2003 9:13 am

Australian Long Winters fan? how did i miss this?

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wonderbex
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regional food quirks

Postby wonderbex » Sat Oct 11, 2003 9:21 am

oh man! i love the thesis -- in the global village, the only thing differentiating regional 'tribes' is distinctive food traits.
when i used to eat eggs, i would put ketchup on scrambled eggs ONLY but i only started doing this in college when i was exposed to other people who put ketchup on their eggs.
peanut-butter on toast ROCKS (when i was in london my acting teacher ate peanut-butter and butter on toast which we thought we was weird) but i was raised eating butter-jam-and-american-cheese on toast which everyone says is weird, although i also like jam and cottage cheese (both of these delicacies come from my mother).
i wish i lived in santa fe because i would be a chilihead. we don't really have that phenomenon here in nyc although last night i was introduced to the 'prairie fire' which is a shot of tequila liberally dosed with hot sauce and let me tell you, YEAH, that's a hearty shot, WOO.
i was also informed recently that the protein-shake phenomenon (as in, people like me who feel better about themselves by getting all their nutrients for the day in a protein shake) apparently only exists in NYC and LA -- is this true?
and do people outside of NJ eat cheesefries and gravy?
you know when you're traveling and restaurants offer 'geniune ____ food product' (like Genuine Philly Cheese Steaks! or New York Deli! Or Southern California Mexican! Or Texas-Style Chili!) -- doesn't that always make you feel weird?
but then again, i'll order anything from a menu if it's 'FAMOUS' (and vegematarian).

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John
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Postby John » Sat Oct 11, 2003 11:39 am

Fries and gravy is a Canadian staple.

But what the hell is this 5-way phenomenon in the Middle West? In both Cinncinnati and now Iowa City I have partaken of Spaghetti covered in Chilli, onions, ketchup and cheese! What is this madness? They call it 5-way, which sounds dirty.

Protein shakes can be found wherever you find rich hippies.

The greatest food ever is Kraft macaroni with a boil-in-the-bag salisbury steak trown on top, which is a regionalism from the Spokane area.

And toasted peanutbutter bread is the hottest.

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wonderbex
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pull back those claws, mister

Postby wonderbex » Sat Oct 11, 2003 11:42 am

John wrote:Protein shakes can be found wherever you find rich hippies.




them's fighting words, bucko.

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Tater
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Postby Tater » Sat Oct 11, 2003 1:15 pm

I am curious if anyone knows of any other regionalistic tendancies regarding french fries. Ketchup is of course the most common compliment and can be found everywhere. What is facinating is the other "secondary" choices I have found in life's travels.

"Fry Sauce" - I believe I have only found this in the Salt Lake City to Southeastern Idaho corridor. It is a blend of ketchup and mayonaise, premixed and packaged. This is so entrenched that I have actually gotten "Fry Sauce" packets at an Idaho Falls McDonalds.

Tarter Sauce - I saw this only during my college days in Spokane, nowhere else. I still have cravings for the Dick's Whammy burger with an order of fries and some tarter.

Malt Vinegar - This I have actually found several places, but I envision it as perhaps being a New England kind of thing.

Cheese Fries - Found primarily in the Midwest. Perfected by the Weiner's Circle on Clark street in Chicago. Done correctly it is another prime example of Chicagoans complete disregard for one's physical well being.

Having said that I think I am going to have to visit the Weiner's Cirle before the show tonight.

Can anyone add to this list? There are areas that I am not familiar with and am curious as to whether the gravy thing can be found in statistically significant amounts south of the Canadian border.

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omphale
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Postby omphale » Sat Oct 11, 2003 2:26 pm

well, i once had a friend who ate his tater-tots with blue cheese dressing, but that's not french fries, that's tater-tots.

i have never heard of this 5-way thing before but it sounds hideous.

midwesterners eating their eggs with ketchup (i really don't give a crap which way y'all want to spell it), eh? are you sure your family is not secretly from brooklyn, betty felon?

i think gravy belongs on everything. actually, if i were to open a restaurant, everything would be chicken fried with gravy. yes, everything. i'm talkin chicken fried gravy with gravy. i thought that was a strictly southern inclination so i'm pretty excited to learn about the canadians gravy habits.

my kid came home from kindergarten wanting american cheese and jelly sandwiches, and i was really curious about where that came from --where ya from wonderbex?

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Midori
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Postby Midori » Sat Oct 11, 2003 7:23 pm

Another killer breakfast is the toast and creamcheese sandwich. Mmmm. You know what else is good? Putting sour cream on hamburgers. Apparently, according to my dad, back in the day Miami kids dipped bananas in sour cream and put sugar on them, but I have never seen someone do that and it sounds raunchy to me.

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warmfuzzysocks
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Postby warmfuzzysocks » Sat Oct 11, 2003 8:59 pm

Fry Sauce - mentioned earlier, but I make it myself here in michigan and it's j ust heavanly.

Gravy and Fries - also mentioned earlier, poutine, also heavanly.

5-way chili - we do that here too, but i stay away from it.

Ketchup on Eggs - never.

Peanut Butter on anything - never.

Honey on fries - Heavenly.

Bread and Butter with sugar on it - wonderful.

it's really cold in here!

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BladeRunner
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Postby BladeRunner » Sat Oct 11, 2003 9:59 pm

John wrote:Fries and gravy is a Canadian staple.


I believe it's called poutine

Image

As for me, umm, I had a pretty generic household. peanut butter and jelly sandwiches, and the like. Although I've find ketchup potatoe chips to be the devil.

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the new girl
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On French Fries...

Postby the new girl » Sat Oct 11, 2003 11:31 pm

Fries and a Wendy's Frosty. Dip fries into frosty and enjoy. Just the right combo of salty and sweet, hot and cold.

I have friends who eat ranch on anything and everything, fries included. I tend to prefer BBQ sauce.

Also, I think the malt vinegar thing is of British origin, but I'm not sure.

I'll second the tasty combo of a late-night Dick's burger, fries and tartar--I've enjoyed it several times in my 3+ years at school in Spokane...now I'm hungry for some grease...

NatureBoy
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Postby NatureBoy » Sat Oct 11, 2003 11:45 pm

Anyone try garlic on an apple?

It's deee-lish!

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heather
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Postby heather » Sun Oct 12, 2003 1:12 am

okay okay wait..

GRAVY ON FRIES?

ew ew ew ew ew ew ew.

spokane is the greatest city on the planet. someday i will move there.

also, prairie fires are only good for 21st birfdays. [yes, BIRFDAYS] there's nothing like handing over the shotglass to your trusting friend with a "happy birfday" and a smile.

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Moni
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Postby Moni » Sun Oct 12, 2003 1:24 am

My feelings towards peanut butter toast are those of a thoroughly indifferent kind.

Now, disregarding the fact that the previous sentence in this post might not make a lot of sense, I would like to add:
- I remember fries with some sort of melted cheese and some kind of meat in Dublin. Sounds weird but was actually pretty good.
- I don’t really remember where fries with mayo are common, but I believe it’s Germany ("Pommes mit Majo"?), among other possible places.

Garlic on apple – sounds weird but I can actually imagine that. Just depends on the apple methinks.

Ketchup on eggs - YIKES

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LngHrvWntrsDngr
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Postby LngHrvWntrsDngr » Sun Oct 12, 2003 8:02 am

my sister won't eat fries w/o parmasean cheese....and its normally a "lets dump the restraunts entire supply of cheese on my plate, dip my fries in ketchup and then drown them in it" sorta ordeal...


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