what are you reading?

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aj
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Post by aj »

I heart Hope For the Flowers by Trina Paulus
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Liesbeth
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Post by Liesbeth »

Read the Da Vinci Code on holiday. Have to admit I went through its 600 pages really fast, because it just rollercoasters on with blunt precision. The precision is in the plot, which is finely crafted. The bluntness comes in the writing, like all his energy went into a (sometimes highly annoying) display of knowledge and producing a cliffhanger on every other page and the rest was made up from the big book of cliches.

Luckily I'm reading Life Of Pi now. Maybe it's just the contrast with Dan Brown, but it seems to sparkle with eloquence, with a joy for words and how they can convey emotion. This is the kind of book that I'm glad I bought, because I will want to read it again, and again, and that to me is the biggest praise a book can get.
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Squid
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Post by Squid »

BETTY! BETTY! BETTY!

i got my old man to pick up the secret history...and he likes it!

he said he LOVES it.

(faints dead away)

Dude, i don't even care if he loves ME, as long as he loves the book.

uh, read the new one yet? Yeah, me neither. (sigh)
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Betty Felon
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Post by Betty Felon »

Yay! Isn't it amazing how all it takes is one great book to make a reader out of someone? Just one.

I haven't even come close to buying the monstrous new one. I'm afraid of the cover art.
A Brutaful Smile
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Post by A Brutaful Smile »

i am currently reading "a man named dave". it's the 3rd installment of a set. book one is "a child called it" and the 2nd is "the lost boy". there is also a 4th book, but it is more of a motivational, inspirational type and i will not be reading it.
basically it's about a man who survived serious child abuse. i wouldn't really recommend it for the weak of hearts. it is a tough read.

i would however recommend anything by laurie notaro who is a damn funny writer. she was (is?) a columnist in AZ and she writes about herself and her family. it's seriously laugh out loud funny.

i think the next book i will be reading is "13th gen" which i started many many years ago and never finished because it pissed me off. i'm gonna read it to see if i rememebr why i hated it so much as to get rid of it if need be.
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Unremarkable
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Post by Unremarkable »

I am finally reading The Davinci Code, and I just can't put it down. It's so interesting. In the front of the book it says that all of the historic mumbo-jumbo it talks about is fact. Can anyone confirm or deny it?
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Squid
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Post by Squid »

Betty Felon wrote:Yay! Isn't it amazing how all it takes is one great book to make a reader out of someone? Just one.

I haven't even come close to buying the monstrous new one. I'm afraid of the cover art.


heh, yeaaah, he's a reader, we've just never really wanted to read the same books! LOL. so i'm excited.

is the cover art really that bad? i'm just scared it's gonna suck.

Brutaful Smile's mention of child abuse survivors also reminds me that Augusten Burroughs' new one called Magical Thinking: True Stories is due out next month. I imagine it's terribly unhip to like Burroughs at this point, but I really liked Dry, so there you go...I'll most likely hit the in-store when he comes to town.
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Liesbeth
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Post by Liesbeth »

Unremarkable wrote:I am finally reading The Davinci Code, and I just can't put it down. It's so interesting. In the front of the book it says that all of the historic mumbo-jumbo it talks about is fact. Can anyone confirm or deny it?

well, the catholic church firmly denies some of it ;-)

I'm on a Booker Price run, after Life of Pi I'm now reading Vernon God Little by DBC Pierre. Boy, am I glad I'm not a teenager anymore.
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Moni
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Post by Moni »

I just finished the autobiography of Alma Mahler-Werfel, and now for something completely different: Irving Welsh's "Porno."
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Betty Felon
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Post by Betty Felon »

Liz wrote:I just finished the autobiography of Alma Mahler-Werfel, and now for something completely different: Irving Welsh's "Porno."


You'll have to tell me how Irvine Welsh works out. I've been thinking about giving him a try.
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Moni
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Post by Moni »

Betty Felon wrote:
Liz wrote:I just finished the autobiography of Alma Mahler-Werfel, and now for something completely different: Irving Welsh's "Porno."


You'll have to tell me how Irvine Welsh works out. I've been thinking about giving him a try.


Well I haven't even read "Trainspotting," so I am curious, too.

Anyway, "Porno" (= the sequel to Trainspotting) is a nice book to read on the tram surrounded by people suspiciously eyeing the cover, I can tell you that...
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LoveSickJerk
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Post by LoveSickJerk »

I just finished reading (after I FINALLY finished the corrections) Ishmael and The Story Of B both by Daniel Quinn. After a week of magazine catch up (thanks UTR!) and settling into post mind-fuck mode, I finally started reading The Eight by Katherine Neville. I am officially 9 months behind in my reading, as I got this book for Christmas last year. The good news is, I intend (and probably will) finish this by week's end. Then it is on to Pagan Holiday about ancient roman tourist travel routes through Europe. Yay!
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Betty Felon
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Post by Betty Felon »

LoveSickJerk wrote:I just finished reading (after I FINALLY finished the corrections) Ishmael and The Story Of B both by Daniel Quinn. After a week of magazine catch up (thanks UTR!) and settling into post mind-fuck mode, I finally started reading The Eight by Katherine Neville. I am officially 9 months behind in my reading, as I got this book for Christmas last year. The good news is, I intend (and probably will) finish this by week's end. Then it is on to Pagan Holiday about ancient roman tourist travel routes through Europe. Yay!


"The Eight" is ok. But if you've read one Kathrine Neville book, you've read them all. It's literally exactly the same story/characters/etc. as "A Calculated Risk" only it's about Chess instead of Bonds.

This ancient roman tourist thing looks interesting. It's non fiction I assume?

I'm on a major travel writing kick lately. Pico Iyer fills my heart. I can't describe his writing any other way. He offers so much insight and philosophy, and he's so well read and simultaneously aware of pop culture, that I learn something fascinating or am made to think deeply every three pages. And his words are gorgeous.

All travel writing should aspire to the level of Pico Iyer.
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LoveSickJerk
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Post by LoveSickJerk »

I have never read a Neville book before, so I'm glad this is the first, and possibly the last. I'm not sold on her style, nor is it setting my world on fire. But I could use a good thriller/mystery/pulp fantasy book after what I just read.

Pagan Holiday is non fiction, and its a lovely travel book too. I can't wait to read it. Its a late addition and it jumped up into my "must read" section quickly. I've added Iyer to a list of authors I should check out, depending of course, my enjoyment of this first travel book. I think i'll be ok. I've been meaning to get to some of Twains' travel writing, but I've never found myself in the mood to find it out.
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Liesbeth
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Post by Liesbeth »

Liz wrote:Well I haven't even read "Trainspotting," so I am curious, too.

Don't know if Porno is the same, but I never finished Trainspotting on account of the language. Phonetic Scotch pronunciation doesn't make for easy reading. And this was after I'd seen the movie. I remember I liked the book, but it was just too hard.
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c-dog
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Post by c-dog »

Betty Felon wrote:
You'll have to tell me how Irvine Welsh works out. I've been thinking about giving him a try.


I definitely recommend "Trainspotting" - it takes a chapter or so to get used to the Scottish slang - kind of like reading "A Clockwork Orange" in that sense. If you don't want to commit to a whole book right away try "Ecstasy" It is made up of three, quite twisted, love stories. His writing is very energetic, wry, and fun to read.

Has anyone ever read anything by Jonathan Coe or Geoff Dyer? Someone suggested them to me so I was curious if anyone here had any opinions.
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grant
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Post by grant »

Geoff Dyer -- isn't he the Out of Sheer Rage fellow? Charming, funny stuff, that. Has a piece in a recent Granta - the one on celebrities, I think, Her Majesty the Queen on the cover - about a drug fueled jaunt across Amsterdam that seems far too true to life to be as funny as it is.
the hutch
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Post by the hutch »

"Middlesex" by Jeffrey Eugenides. It has genocide, incest, consanguinity, and a history of Detroit, all tied up the story of someone with 5 alpha reductase deficiency, in which a genetic male is raised female. Great read, pediatric endocrinology as literature, I highly recommend it.
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aj
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Post by aj »

no pic wrote:"Middlesex" by Jeffrey Eugenides. It has genocide, incest, consanguinity, and a history of Detroit, all tied up the story of someone with 5 alpha reductase deficiency, in which a genetic male is raised female. Great read, pediatric endocrinology as literature, I highly recommend it.


I'm about 3/4 through as we speak. so far I am really enjoying it.
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Post by the hutch »

me too! I just got to the part where Cal gets to hold the Obscure Object in his/her arms as the Jewish girl collapses on stage from a burst aneurysm. Genius!
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