what are you reading?

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Betty Felon
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Postby Betty Felon » Mon Jun 21, 2004 1:44 pm

I thought it was just ok. It was rather exhausting to read, every three pages is a cliffhanger. It's something like 200 chapters in 400 pages. I like to sink into a book uninterupted for pages.

Dan Brown has been around for years. Sort of a dime store, beach read, type of writer. .....meh.

I did like the analysis of the Da Vinci paintings though.

You want a great mystery? "The Secret History" by Donna Tarrt.

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Squid
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Postby Squid » Mon Jun 21, 2004 4:18 pm

Damn Straight!

Secret History RULES.

Have you read the newer one? I haven't yet...

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Betty Felon
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Postby Betty Felon » Tue Jun 22, 2004 5:21 am

I haven't read it yet either. I was so excited about it, and then it was released, and I sort of deflated. I think I read a review somewhere that made it seem unappealing.

Damn you critics and your influencing ways!

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Betty Felon
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Postby Betty Felon » Tue Jun 22, 2004 6:56 am

For those of you that love non-fiction, I picked up a particularly fascinating book, "A General Theory of Love" by Thomas Lewis, MD, Fari Amini, and Richard Lannon.

It takes a biochemical look at how romantic love and strong social relationships are formed. We actually go through real withdrawal when someone we've formed bonds with leaves us, and the withdrawl can be so powerful that it has killed rhesus monkeys and lack of love and physical touch has caused children to waste away into nothing and become unable to function.

The book also makes a strong argument for how our brains develop around the people we spend time with and how they respond to us.

It throws some questions up about our traveling people.... Those who don't put down roots anywhere and constantly move from place to place.

Anyway, it's wonderfully interesting and quite well written. Thumbs up.

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aj
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Postby aj » Tue Jun 22, 2004 9:21 am

what kind of q's about the no roots people? will it make me irate?

I don't think I can read that book, but I'm intrigued. need more convincing.

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Betty Felon
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Postby Betty Felon » Tue Jun 22, 2004 10:38 am

hmmm. I don't know, do you get irate easily?

The book itself doesn't raise those questions, Betty's Brain raised those questions when she was reading it. It is a seriously enjoyable read, and the social theories and life philosophy it explains strike me as very healthy and interesting, even though I can't say I buy them hook, line, and sinker.

I'm only a few chapters in right now, and I'm gonna have to put it aside to read a certain 950 page autobiography.

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grant
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Postby grant » Tue Jun 22, 2004 11:27 am

Took a break from the gnosticism to inhale Samuel Delany's Babel 17, a science fiction novel in which a starship captain (who is also a telepathic linguist and galaxy-renowned poet) is hired to translate a new language used by invaders, and learns that the language itself is a secret weapon. Accidentally, this seems to dovetail nicely with the next book in my stack, Cryptonomicon, followed by Eco's Baudolino.

The Da Vinci Code is a pot-boiler, fairly typical in structure, but with some wonderful trappings. Heresy and conspiratology make for wonderful set dressing. Holy Blood, Holy Grail is a more in-depth look at much of the same stuff (officially labeled as non-fiction), as is Lomas & Knight's The Hiram Key, which is even wider in scope, and more fun to read than either of the other two. Although far more conjectural than it lets on.

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aj
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Postby aj » Tue Jun 22, 2004 3:20 pm

Betty Felon wrote:hmmm. I don't know, do you get irate easily?



no. but I hate when people say "these people ARE like THIS. and those people ARE like THIS." I like philosophizing and hate concrete statements that generalize, label and lump people into categories.

I like when an author believes you are capable of thought. leads you to something rather than throws it in your face.

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Postby Liesbeth » Wed Jun 23, 2004 1:53 am

The Secret History got me back on the reading trail, five years after compulsory literature analysis in school had crushed my love for reading. I read it in one weekend, barely stopping to eat and sleep.
The Little Friend could not live up to that, and I've never gotten past halfway.

The DaVinci code was just given to me for my birthday by my colleagues. I hadn't heard of it, but nearly 600 pages: seems like a great thing for the holidays to me.

At the moment I am rereading a book which is one of the gems of my childhood reading (and I would read a lot): Meester van de zwarte molen, or Krabat in German, the original language. Don't know if it was translated into English, but maybe Moni knows it? Wonderfully dark story, kind of like a 200 page grim fairy tale.

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LoveSickJerk
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Postby LoveSickJerk » Wed Jun 23, 2004 4:47 am

grant wrote:.... followed by Eco's Baudolino.


You won't be dissapointed with that one. A really wonderful novel, which almost lets you down, but picks you up at the right moment.

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Moni
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Postby Moni » Wed Jun 23, 2004 6:49 am

LoveSickJerk wrote:
grant wrote:.... followed by Eco's Baudolino.


You won't be dissapointed with that one. A really wonderful novel, which almost lets you down, but picks you up at the right moment.

ha, i just finished this one. have to agree with you, tho the letdown is a rather small one.
VERY enjoyable read, very smart.

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Postby mms » Thu Jun 24, 2004 9:15 am

Oh wow! YOu guys are awesome. I guess The Long Winters' fans have more than the Otters in common. We've got books too! I'm currently reading the God of Small Things and I got Eco's Baudolino on my night stand as the next up.

Thanks for the tips about Hamilton's biography (yeah, he's the most brilliant economist this country has produced!) and Dave Eggers and The DaVinci Code. Will be sure to pick those up soon.

My friends are huge fans of Umberto Eco, Milan Kundera, and Tom Robbins. Any of you into Tom Robbins? Seattle people?

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gingerman
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Postby gingerman » Thu Jun 24, 2004 11:02 pm

gingerman wrote:I'm reading this forum.
....and also the complete Grimm's Fairie Tales.
I recommend Fierce Invalids Home From Hot Climates by Tom Robbins...Switters is the man.


I also recommend Another Roadside Attraction to anyone looking for a new adventure

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smelllikelime
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Postby smelllikelime » Mon Jun 28, 2004 1:15 am

I'm on the third book of the Chronicles of Narnia at the moment. I can't believe I'm only getting around to reading this now! They are the kind of stories that I keep thinking about when I'm not reading it and I can't wait to get back to.

Someone kind of sheepishly mentioned Harry Potter and to you I say: no shame!! The Harry Potter books are wonderful, I've read them all a ton of times. Maybe I'm just a big ol' freak, but I adore them.

Someone else mentioned Tom Robbins, he's another favorite of mine. I think my very favorite is Neil Gaiman, who I don't think anyone else has mentioned. There must be some comic nerds in here, c'mon. I could read his books/comics over and over and over and over.

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grant
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Postby grant » Mon Jun 28, 2004 6:17 am

More of an Alan Moore fan, myself.

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LoveSickJerk
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Postby LoveSickJerk » Mon Jun 28, 2004 8:14 am

grant wrote:More of an Alan Moore fan, myself.

I concur. Though Gaiman has done some wonderful stuff, I just can't stop reading Watchmen, and The league, all of his ABC stuff...And let's not forget Jeff Smith's Bone series! Oh comic books. Batman cause he's only human. SpiderMan cause he's funny. Especially the Ultimate Spider man stuff. Its SO good.

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Squid
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Postby Squid » Thu Jul 01, 2004 5:19 pm

smelllikelime wrote:I think my very favorite is Neil Gaiman, who I don't think anyone else has mentioned. There must be some comic nerds in here, c'mon. I could read his books/comics over and over and over and over.


i sorta mentioned it previously, but i'm currently into Dogwitch. it's gothy, but since you dig gaiman, that wont get in yer way. :) I too loved the Sandman Chrons...though, truth be told, i'm really more obsessed with one of the illustrators he works with, Dave McKean.

ALSO! I've just finished David Foster Wallace's new one, Oblivion. I think I need to join wallace-1 and do some braindumping before i'm ready give an opinion. it twas dense. but i perservered, oh yes i did...

Next up! thanks to c-dog and hovering and grant and a few others, i discovered that there Urban Think bookstore in Orlando, FLA. So next up is something i got there: The Vintage Book of Contemporary Chinese Fiction. hopefully no one here turns their noses up at "greatest hits" fiction comps? a girl's gotta start somewhere...

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smelllikelime
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Postby smelllikelime » Thu Jul 01, 2004 5:32 pm

Squid wrote:truth be told, i'm really more obsessed with one of the illustrators he works with, Dave McKean.


Oh, swooooon! Dave McKean's work is absolutely incredible.

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grant
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Postby grant » Fri Jul 02, 2004 8:38 am

If you sit through the (slightly entertaining) credits to the most recent Harry Potter film, you'll see him credited as a visual consultant.
In retrospect, the parts he helped design become quite obvious.

The Vintage Book of Contemporary Chinese Fiction


I'm very, very interested in this. Please tell me how it is.

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smelllikelime
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Postby smelllikelime » Fri Jul 02, 2004 10:37 am

grant wrote:If you sit through the (slightly entertaining) credits to the most recent Harry Potter film, you'll see him credited as a visual consultant.
In retrospect, the parts he helped design become quite obvious.


Hey, no way. I think I recall thinking some parts were McKeanesque... Or maybe I was just thinking how effin' hot Ron Weasley's gotten. Either way, I think I should see it again.


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